Friday, August 17, 2012

Underworld


Sequel to Abandon

Summary:
Escape from the realm of the dead is impossible when someone there wants you back.

Seventeen-year-old Pierce Oliviera isn’t dead.

Not this time.

But she is being held against her will in the dim, twilit world between heaven and hell, where the spirits of the deceased wait before embarking upon their final journey.

Her captor, John Hayden, claims it’s for her own safety. Because not all the departed are dear. Some are so unhappy with where they ended up after leaving the Underworld, they’ve come back as Furies, intent on vengeance…on the one who sent them there and on the one whom he loves.

But while Pierce might be safe from the Furies in the Underworld, far worse dangers could be lurking for her there…and they might have more to do with its ruler than with his enemies.

And unless Pierce is careful, this time there’ll be no escape.


My Rating: ***

Hrmm. That's about how I feel. I just wish this was so much more than what it actually turned out to be. I liked Abandon in the same way - good, but just not quite there.

Once again, it's Meg Cabot's pacing that really made this a struggle. Abandon crawled along and so did Underworld. I got 30 pages in and I realized I was still reading the same conversation that started on the first page. Soooo long. Soooo slow. It actually made me pull up my current manuscript and start hacking and slashing at long conversations.

Anyway, I love the concept of modern Persephone retellings, but I haven't loved any of them yet. Goddess Test failed, Abandon is just not there (though John is a MUCH better lord of the underworld than boring Henry from the Goddess Test), and Radiant Darkness was dimly there, but not good enough. Tell me you just got all my bad puns. :D You're welcome.

Anyway, I read it and kind of enjoyed the reading, but at the end I felt like I'd wasted time. The entire book NOTHING happens. Except Pierce occasionally lusting after John. And there is some mild sexual content. And while I was expecting Pierce to struggle to get free of the underworld, there are only two scenes that actually take place in the underworld. The conflict was barely there. I just didn't get what the danger was or the "why?" of the entire book.

In a nutshell? Ok - if you love greek myth retellings. But look elsewhere if you are wanting a great story or great characters or any form of greatness.

1 comment:

Lynnette said...

Thanks for the bad puns. :)